Okinawa JALT YouTube

2021 OkiJALT Trends in Language Teaching International Conference - Keynote: Charles Browne
01:00:50

2021 OkiJALT Trends in Language Teaching International Conference - Keynote: Charles Browne

"Recent Developments in the NGSL Project: a Modular Approach for the Systematic Development of 2nd Language Vocabulary" This presentation will briefly introduce 7 open-source, corpus-derived high frequency vocabulary word lists that the presenter helped to create for second language learners of English, and then move on to introduce and demonstrate a large and growing number of free, pedagogically-driven online tools apps and resources for helping to utilize these lists for teaching, learning, assessment, materials creation, as well as research and analysis. The tools include interactive flashcards, diagnostic tests, games, vocabulary profiling apps, text creation tools, and more. The presentation will also review recent NGSL research. Each word list offers extremely high coverage (92% or higher) of language in that genre and includes lists for general daily English (New General Service List or NGSL), spoken English (New General Service List-Spoken or NGSL-S), academic English (New Academic Word List or NAWL), business English (Business Service List or BSL), TOEIC English (TOEIC Service List or TSL), children’s English (New Dolch List or NDL) and fitness English (Fitness English List or FEL). Most lists were developed in a modular approach so they can be efficiently mixed and matched to meet a broad range of academic needs. 2021 Trends in Language Teaching International Conference, Okinawa #JALT
2021 OkiJALT Summer Symposium - Invited Speaker: Nat Rudolph
34:03

2021 OkiJALT Summer Symposium - Invited Speaker: Nat Rudolph

"Criticality and ELT in Japan: Re-imagining issues and approaches to inquiry/practice" Critical scholarship examining English language teaching (ELT) in and beyond Japan, has historically identified essentialized and idealized “nativeness” in English as the foundation for dominant approaches to theory, research, policymaking; materials development, assessment, teaching and hiring practices. This has resulted in a primary focus on problematizing such “nativeness,” to critically and practically account for diversity and complexity, identity and interaction-wise. Recent scholarship has alternately contended that the construction and maintenance of “idealized nativeness in English” is situated in broader contextualized, sociohistorical negotiations of being and belonging. In Japan, addressing idealized “nativeness” in English (and in education in general) thus involves attention to how constructions of Japaneseness/Otherness within Japan, and the juxtaposition of Japaneseness/Otherness in terms of “the world beyond,” marginalize and erase the voices of individuals negotiating identity and community membership in Japanese society. Of particular concern is the dominant narrative that Japan is sociohistorical site of homogeneity, and that diversity and complexity are both new and from “outside.” In this presentation, I will provide participants with a few suggestions to guide how they approach: a) highlighting and challenging the essentialization and idealization shaping and shaped by ELT in Japan, and b) accounting for diversity and complexity in classroom practice. Okinawa #JALT 2021 Summer Symposium
2021 OkiJALT Trends in Language Teaching International Conference - Miho Nagai
31:40

2021 OkiJALT Trends in Language Teaching International Conference - Miho Nagai

"Trigger creativity and learning in an EFL class via hip-hop/LITE FEET music" This session demonstrates a warm-up class activity (online/face-to-face) that can promote vocabulary learning and retention, utilizing hip-hop music (LITE FEET, a faster-paced hip-hop music/style) as a means to engage students in learning. Vocabulary is a crucial component of second language acquisition; however, teachers often struggle to form an instructional emphasis on word learning (Berne & Blachowicz 2008). To facilitate such a challenge as well as students’ learning capacities, using hip-hop can serve as a greater motivation to the learners at all levels. Recent research shows that a complex brain network (visual, aural, kinetic, etc.) stores and retrieves information more efficiently than a small network (e.g. visual only) (Macedonia 2015). Further, learning is triggered by novelty and emotional engagement (cf. Immordino-Yang 2011), which accordingly indicates that information combined with emotion becomes a long-term memory. Thus, cultivating states of curiosity and playfulness is essential to promote learning. With hip-hop music beats in an activity, (1) students use multiple components while emotionally and enjoyably engaging in an activity and (2) hip-hop music creates a space where self-expression will be appreciated, which contributes to students’ self-confidence (e.g. Schloss 2009). Lastly, a follow-up ‘active recall’ exercise is recommended to help produce long-term retention of knowledge. 2021 Trends in Language Teaching International Conference, Okinawa #JALT
2021 OkiJALT Trends in Language Teaching International Conference - Lily Schofield
31:19
2021 OkiJALT Summer Symposium - Invited Speaker: Masanori Tokeshi
30:07

2021 OkiJALT Summer Symposium - Invited Speaker: Masanori Tokeshi

Frequency of sentence patterns and topics in elementary school English textbooks: “We Can! 1” and “We Can! 2” This presentation aims to identify the relationship between the frequency of sentence patterns and topics in two elementary school English textbooks, “We Can! 1” and “We Can! 2.” The results indicate the following. First, a total of 35 sentence patterns were found. In “We Can! 1,” the frequency of these patterns was identified in 414 samples (mean: 11.8) and in “We Can! 2,” the frequency was observed in 879 samples (mean: 25.1). An estimated 40 % of sentence patterns, which appear over 16 times, satisfy the conditions of language acquisition (Nation, 2001). Second, there was a corresponding match, estimated at about 88%, between sentence patterns found in the two textbooks and the list of sentence patterns recommended in early childhood second language research as well as CEFR-J Grammar Profile (A1). However, there were five sentence patterns that did not appear; present progressive, possessive-’s, past regular verb (only ‘enjoy’ appeared), third singular-s, we are-. Third, the relationship between sentence patterns and topics indicate a strong relevance for students, in terms of familiarity in everyday situations and their development stage. Topics are grouped into four categories: student’s memory and dreams, self and others, everyday situations, Japan and foreign countries. Lastly, there were 9 sentence patterns that frequently appeared throughout the textbooks. These included sentence patters such as: I like apples (ex.), I’m ~(ex.), She can swim fast.(ex.), I want to~(ex.). Okinawa #JALT 2021 Summer Symposium
2021 OkiJALT Trends in Language Teaching International Conference - Rab Paterson
36:00

2021 OkiJALT Trends in Language Teaching International Conference - Rab Paterson

"ACCESSIBILITY Issues for Teachers: Making Better Handouts, Lectures, AND PRESENTATIONS" All educators at some point create handouts and other teaching materials, give lectures (of some form or other) and deliver presentations. Yet many teaching staff pay little attention to the format this content is in, instead focussing only on the information. Not only has research shown this lack of educational focus on format and accessibility issues lower the content / information retention rate of students and attendees (Standing, 1973; (Paivio & Csapo, 1973; Gloede et al., 2017), it can also reduce the cognitive intake itself (Mayer, 2001), and in some cases even exclude certain members of their audience, such as any colour blind and dyslexic people in attendance if the format is not in a suitable style. There are a number of books giving guidance on design for slides and handouts (Duarte, 2008; Reynolds, 2009) and research has been done on Picture Superiority Effect and Dynamic Superiority Effect on educational visuals (Medina, 2011; Matthews et al., 2007; Candan et al., 2015; Buratto et al., 2009) However there are few practical guides on how to use these theoretical results. This session therefore, will give a brief overview and demonstration of apps and approaches that can be utilised to maximise the accessibility of teacher made materials, whether it be brochures, handouts, infographics, posters, PSE style slides, Slideuments or any other teacher made resources. 2021 Trends in Language Teaching International Conference, Okinawa #JALT
2021 OkiJALT Trends in Language Teaching International Conference - Dan Ferreira
41:19

2021 OkiJALT Trends in Language Teaching International Conference - Dan Ferreira

"A Review of Qualitative Theoretical Perspectives in Educational Technology" The sudden shift to emergency remote learning in 2020 has resulted in many instructors worldwide having to bear the burden of integrating new digital media with learning objectives without being able to confidently determine how those efforts affect learning outcomes. This is due to the fact that, on a global scale, many teachers have been largely untrained in aligning the use of digital tools to meet curriculum learning objectives in an online/blending learning context. Although there is no shortage of research devoted to various uses of ICT tools in day-to-day practice, there is a need to address the techno-pedagogical underpinnings of the decision-making process. Theoretical perspectives retain the potential to enhance the use of ICT for educational purposes. They allow teachers/researchers to focus on how evolving digital technologies impact language learning objectives. Until recently, the research trend in educational technology studies has shown an overwhelmingly substantial bias toward quantitative studies. There remains a dearth of research-design studies devoted to exploration and explanation (as opposed to the positivist “pre-test/post-test” approach). In this presentation, Dan Ferreira (Ed.D. specialization in e-Learning) will discuss qualitative theoretical perspectives that can shed light on the use of educational technology that moves beyond those most commonly used in the natural sciences. 2021 Trends in Language Teaching International Conference, Okinawa #JALT
2021 OkiJALT Trends in Language Teaching International Conference - Martina Ronci
31:51
2021 OkiJALT Trends in Language Teaching International Conference - Pui Lee
30:58

2021 OkiJALT Trends in Language Teaching International Conference - Pui Lee

"(Reluctantly?) tech-savvy --- Generation Y English teachers after one year of online teaching" Generation Y (people born between 1981 and 1996) are said to be “digital natives”. They possess the technical know-hows and can use the Internet to their full advantage, yet it they still face challenges in their online experiences. Especially now when the millenniums has become a key part of the workforce, and the pandemic has forced a lot of them to spend unprecedented long hours in synchronous online meetings. Problems like “Zoom burnout” quickly emerged as a threat to their wellness. As teaching is arguably one of the most “zoom-intensive” occupation, researches on teachers’ online teaching experiences is urgently needed as education may remain online for much longer than we anticipated. This research elicits qualitative feedback from a group of millennial English teachers from a university in Hong Kong. At the time of interview, they had been teaching undergraduate EAP and ESP courses (previously delivered face-to-face) via zoom for one year, and would continue doing so for at least one more semester. They talked about how they coped with the “new norm” , how their perceptions and emotions changed over time, and what does this mean to their wellness and professional efficacy. These findings would shed light on how institutions can better prepare and support their teachers, and how to online teaching more efficient and effective. 2021 Trends in Language Teaching International Conference, Okinawa #JALT
2021 OkiJALT Trends in Language Teaching International Conference - Wang Shijie
28:25

2021 OkiJALT Trends in Language Teaching International Conference - Wang Shijie

"Mapping global research trend related to language teaching: a scientometric review" Although language teaching has been attracting scholarly attention in the academia, most research synthesises are qualitative in nature, which entails the quantitative counterpart to complement the validity of the findings. Therefore, to facilitate our understanding of the intellectual landscape of the research in language teaching, based on 1495 research articles published in the journals indexed by SSCI (Social Science Citation Index) between 2000 and 2020, the present study analysed the research trend via the scientometric study software CiteSpace. The findings display that the number of publications in this field witnessed a rapid increase since 2008, which was led by the USA, the UK, and People’s Republic of China. The bursts analysis and cluster analysis exhibited three primary research trends in the past 20 years: (1) the transfer of attention from classroom education to computer-assisted language learning; (2) the reorientation from general English education to ESP (English for Specific Purposes) education; and (3) the change of concentration from teacher (e.g., teacher training and pedagogy) to learner (e.g., individual differences and collaborative learning). Other valuable results and implications were discussed as well, such as the lack of cross-country collaboration. These results perfect the existent research synthesis from a quantitative perspective. 2021 Trends in Language Teaching International Conference, Okinawa #JALT
2021 OkiJALT Trends in Language Teaching International Conference - Dagiimaa Sangirinchin
30:52

2021 OkiJALT Trends in Language Teaching International Conference - Dagiimaa Sangirinchin

"Development of students' vocabulary in teaching English" S.R Rubinstein (1987) emphasizes that "the fundamental condition of word memorizing is appearance of concepts." Word as a unit of speech inseparably connected with concepts, so the concepts are the basis of the word usage. It is important to take into account the peculiarities of this psychological process of acquisition of vocabulary of foreign language. When we teach English vocabulary we provide students with reading and repeating exercises, with translation of words, working with pictures, translating words from the dictionaries, giving synonyms and antonyms, objecting things around , playing games and combining some exercises together . All these activities should be directed to creating concepts in minds of learners. New word creates new concept in human mind at the signal level two, which is different from the concepts of native or original language. On the basis these concepts of new words learners can get the abilities to make productive speech. If we have no concepts of words they mostly can be forgotten. Especially for adult people, their ability for logical thinking is high and their native language help them to develop logical thinking and gives them a sense of meaning of words in a short period of time. Therefore use of mother tongue in teaching vocabulary of English is the best way to help students in improving knowledge of English vocabulary. 2021 Trends in Language Teaching International Conference, Okinawa #JALT
2021 OkiJALT Trends in Language Teaching International Conference - Richard Sampson
27:04
2021 OkiJALT Trends in Language Teaching International Conference - Pino Cutrone & Beh Siewkee
37:59

2021 OkiJALT Trends in Language Teaching International Conference - Pino Cutrone & Beh Siewkee

"Overcoming Problems Associated with Remote Learning in the Japanese EFL University Context " This presentation will describe a study which sought to identify problems associated with remote learning in the Japanese EFL university context during the Covid-19 pandemic. After having administered online lessons for four months, 30 EFL teachers in Japanese universities were asked to rate the seriousness of 17 potential problems and, subsequently, provide comments about these problems. The procedure of this study involved distributing online questionnaires to the participants of this study. Questionnaires were comprised of 24 items, 22 of which were closed-ended and 2 of which were open-ended. Data were analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Responses from teachers in this study stressed two problem areas that were especially serious and in need of attention: time spent checking assignments and time spent preparing. Furthermore, other problems such as time spent communicating with students, suitability of activities, preparing stimulating activities, time spent teaching, clarity of methods and evaluation, students submitting assignments, and issues with Internet bandwidth were deemed at least somewhat serious and in need of some further attention. The writers discuss the implications of these findings and offer some suggestions for EFL teachers to consider moving forward. 2021 Trends in Language Teaching International Conference, Okinawa #JALT